www.rhci-online.net/radiogram/radiogram.htm

 


 

 

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                                                                    http://voaradiogram.net/

 

Slanted images this weekend / Hello friends,

Almost all of you are sending back slanted images from VOA Radiogram 34  this weekend.
The problem is not your reception or decoding. It is obviously at the VOA end, either in the recording of the program or the playback at the transmitter site.
Merkouris Gogos in Greece sent correct images, but this is what he wrote:
"The +180 ppm sample rate correction value, which was working for months, had to be changed to -2080 ppm!"                                     Δ ppm  +180/-2080   =   -2260 ppm


I tried the same from my recording of reception via the University of Twente SDR receiver, and had to set the ppm correction to -2400 ppm.
For reception the rest of this weekend, I would recommend that you start with Merkouris's parameters.  In Fldigi: Configure > Sound Card  > Settings > under Corrections set the RX ppm to -2080. 
If you can record the broadcast, then decode from the recording, you can try various corrections to see what provides you with the straightest images.
I apologize for the inconvenience.

Kim
 

More about then slanted images this weekend on VOA Radiogram...

Mark Hirst in the UK writes:
"After several calibration checks, my setting was -2250 for RX."
So you can try Mark's -2250 ppm or Merkouris's -2080 ppm
In Fldigi: Configure > Sound Card >  Settings > Corrections -- under  Corrections set RX ppm to 2080 or 2250 or something in between. 
Record the show if you can and try various adjustments decoding from the recording.


Kim
 

Roger:

For myself, I determined a value of about -2260 ppm (previously it was zero)

 

 

 

 

 

RSID: <<2013-11-23T16:02Z MFSK-16 @ 17860000+1500>>

 

 

 

Welcome to program 34 of VOA Radio from the Voice of America.

 

I'm Kim Andrew Elliott in Washington.

 

Here is the lineup for today's program:

 

  1:39  MFSK16: Program preview (now) (3:07)

  4:50  MFSK32: Milky Way evolution, with image (4:52)

  9:41  MFSK32: Russian text sample* (2:11)

11:54  MFSK64: Russian text sample* and image (1:49)

13:39  MFSK64/Flmsg**: Aquaponics, with image (5:17)

19:11  MFSK32: Email address (:43)

19:55  MFSK128: High school cubesat (1:18)

21:14  MFSK128L: High school cubesat (1:39)

22:55  MFSK32: Image of satellite (2:04)

24:58  MFSK32: Closing announcements (:34)

25:30  MFSK32: Some extras...

 

*Use UTF-8 character set

 

**Use Flmsg with Fldigi.

 

Please send reception reports to radiogram@voanews.com

 

And visit voaradiogram.net

 

Twitter: @VOARadiogram

 

VOA Radiogram now changes to MFSK32...

 

 

 

 

 

 

RSID: <<2013-11-23T16:05Z MFSK-32 @ 17860000+1500>>

 

 

This is VOA Radiogram in MFSK32...

 

 

As we approach the winter solstice, reception on our 17860 and

15670 kHz frequencies to Europe may become more difficult. The

faster text modes might not provide 100% copy, but the slower

modes should be more robust during poor conditions. Here

is a VOA News story in our usually reliable MFSK32 mode...

 

 

Hubble 'Scrapbook' Sheds Light on Milky Way's Evolution

 

VOA News

November 15, 2013

 

The U.S. space agency, NASA, released a series of photos that

show how our galaxy, the Milky Way, may have evolved.

 

Astronomers used Hubble's deep-sky surveys to study the evolution

of 400 galaxies similar to the Milky Way and noted their

appearance at various stages of development over a time span of

11 billion years.

 

Judging from images of these far-flung galaxies, they found the

Milky Way likely began as faint, blue, low-mass object containing

lots of gas. Gas is the fuel for star birth and the blue color is

an indicator of rapid star formation. It was probably a flat disk

with a bulge in the middle, both of which grew simultaneously

into the majestic spiral seen today.

 

"For the first time, we have direct images of what the Milky Way

looked like in the past," said study co-leader Pieter G. van

Dokkum of Yale University in New Haven, Conn. "Of course, we

can't see the Milky Way itself in the past. We selected galaxies

billions of light-years away that will evolve into galaxies like

the Milky Way. By tracing the Milky Way's siblings, we find that

our galaxy built up 90 percent of its stars between 11 billion

and 7 billion years ago, which is something that has not been

measured directly before."

 

The team's results were published July 10 in The Astrophysical

Journal Letters. A second paper appears in the Nov. 11 online

edition of The Astrophysical Journal.

 

http://www.voanews.com/content/hubble-scrapbook-sheds-light-on-evolution-of-milky-way/1791040.html

 

 

 

Next on VOA Radiogram, an MFSK32 image with the caption: This

artist's illustration of the early Milky Way is based on photos

of similar galaxies taken by the Hubble Space Telescope...

 

 

 

Sending Pic:214x124C;

 

Internet:

 

 

 

 

 

Next on VOA Radiogram, more of our experiments with non-Latin

alphabets.

 

The following is an excerpt of a VOA Russian new story in the

MFSK32 mode...

 

 

 

 

Because of the additional code required for the Cyrillic script,

the Russian prints out rather slowly in MFSK32. Let's try to

speed up the printout of the Russian text using the MFSK64 mode.

 

VOA Radiogram now changes to MFSK64...

 

 

RSID: <<2013-11-23T16:10Z MFSK-32 @ 17860000+1500>>

 

 

 

 

 

 

НАСА хочет уменьшить зависимость от России

 

Русская служба Голоса Америки

 

20.11.2013

 

Несмотря на неопределенность с бюджетом, НАСА объявило прием

заявок на создание коммерческого космического такси для доставки

космонавтов на Международную космическую станцию.

 

 

 

 

 

RSID: <<2013-11-23T16:12Z MFSK-64 @ 17860000+1500>>

 

 

 

This is VOA Radiogram in MFSK64...

 

 

НАСА хочет уменьшить зависимость от России

 

Русская служба Голоса Америки

 

20.11.2013

 

Несмотря на неопределенность с бюджетом, НАСА объявило прием

заявок на создание коммерческого космического такси для доставки

космонавтов на Международную космическую станцию.

 

Благодаря этому аэрокосмическое агентство США надеется к 2017

году покончить с монополией России на доставку экипажей к МКС.

 

 

 

 

   

 

Sending Pic:229x35C;

 

 

 

http://www.golos-ameriki.ru/content/nasa-russia/1793731.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please send reception reports to radiogram@voanews.com

 

And visit voaradiogram.net

 

Twitter: VOARadiogram

 

VOA Radiogram continues in MFSK64 for a VOA News story in Flmsg

format:

 

 

 

... start

[WRAP:beg][WRAP:lf][WRAP:fn VOAR34_aquaponics.b2s]<flmsg>1.1.33

:hdr_fm:19

VOA 20132111082636

:hdr_ed:19

VOA 20132111054214

<blankform>

:mg:4473 <svg version="1.1" width="98" height="42">

<polygon fill="#132FBE" points="22,25 29,1 43,1 30,42 15,42 0,1 15,1"/>

<polygon fill="#132FBE" points="77,17 83,42 98,42 84,1 70,1 55,42 70,42"/>

<circle fill="#FFFFFF" cx="49" cy="21" r="21"/>

<circle fill="#132FBE" cx="49" cy="21" r="9"/>

</svg>

<h1 style="color:#132FBE;font-family:sans-serif">Voice of America</h1><h2

style="color:#FF0000;font-family:sans-serif">News / Science & Technology</h2><h2 style="font-family:sans-serif">

Combined Fish-Vegetable Farming Catching On</h2><b>Steve Baragona<br>November 18, 2013</b>

 

BALTIMORE - The fish don't like strangers.

 

Ellen Perlman pours a scoop of fish food into one of four blue plastic tanks at Chesapeake Aquaponics, about half an hour

from Baltimore. Picture a giant kiddie pool that's deep enough to stand in up to your belly.

 

"You would think we have piranhas here," she said, expecting a torrent of tilapia to froth the water's surface but it

remains stubbornly smooth. She chuckled. "Maybe not."

 

She says the fish recognize her voice and her footsteps, but not a visiting reporter's.

 

"Fish are very sensitive animals," she added.

 

<b>Environmental sweet spot</b>

 

But it's an indelicate aspect of these delicate creatures that makes her garden grow. From these tanks, water rich in what

you might call "fish manure" flows through a filter system and into the adjacent plant beds, where lettuce and other

vegetable plants float in Styrofoam rafts.

 

"It's a way of recycling the fish nutrients," she says.

 

It's called aquaponics. It combines aquaculture - or fish farming - with hydroponics - growing plants without soil.

 

Aquaponics hits a sweet spot for environmentalists. It recycles fish waste into plant food. Hydroponics typically uses less

water than conventional farming. And for those concerned about insecticides on their produce, the fact that the fish share

the water with the plants means aquaponic farmers have to be very careful about what they spray.

 

"Any type of spray would harm the fish," Perlman said. Even insecticidal soaps popular with organic growers are off limits.

 

Another part of aquaponics' appeal is the fact that overfishing is depleting the world's oceans.  Fish farming accounts for

at least half the world's production, but waste from all those confined fish is polluting some areas.

 

"There are fewer and fewer fish in the ocean and more and more fish will be raised on farms," said Dave Love, a microbiolog

ist with the Johns Hopkins University Center for a Livable Future (CLF). "The trick is, how do we do that responsibly,

sustainably and in ways that make fish farmers money?"

 

<b>Small but productive</b>

 

Tackling those questions is what CLF's Cylburn Aquaponics Farm aims to do.

 

Located next to greenhouses at Baltimore's Cylburn Arboretum, the farm has been up and running for a little over a year.

 

Farm manager Laura Genello says she's delivering about 10 to 20 pounds (five to 10 kilograms) of produce per week to local

farmers markets from about 300 square feet (28 square meters) of growing space.

 

"Which is relatively small," she said, "but 10 pounds of greens is a fair amount of greens."

 

The farm harvested its first 20 one-kilo fish earlier this fall, and they expect to produce about 275 fish per year.

 

<b>Profitable?</b>

 

But whether aquaponics is profitable is an open question. Energy costs are a big factor.

 

"Our tilapia like 70 degrees (21C). In the winter, it gets quite a bit cooler," Love said. "So, we need to heat the space."

 

Cylburn Aquaponics Farm is grant-funded, but Chesapeake Aquaponics is a commercial venture. It has not turned a profit yet,

but Perlman is optimistic that providing high-quality fresh greens in the middle of winter will win her a niche market.

 

The elegance of aquaponics' symbiosis is alluring, and aquaponic businesses and nonprofit projects are popping up around

the country and around the world.

 

But Genello is cautious.

 

"I think we have to be careful about not getting ahead of ourselves with the excitement about the system because there are

a lot of things that are not quite perfect about it," Genello said. "That's why it's really important for more people to

actually do aquaponics, so we get more people experimenting and playing around with what works and what doesn't."

 

<a href="http://www.voanews.com/content/combined-fish-vegetable-farming-catching-on/1792728.html">www.voanews.com/content/c

ombined-fish-vegetable-farming-catching-on/1792728.html</a>

[WRAP:chksum 5BD7][WRAP:end]

... end

 

 








Voice of America

News / Science & Technology

Combined Fish-Vegetable Farming Catching On

Steve Baragona
November 18,
2013

BALTIMORE - The fish don't like strangers.

Ellen Perlman pours a scoop of fish food into one of four blue plastic tanks at
Chesapeake Aquaponics, about half an hour from Baltimore. Picture a giant kiddie
pool that's deep enough to stand in up to your belly.

"You would think we have piranhas here," she said, expecting a torrent of tilapia
to froth the water's surface but it remains stubbornly smooth. She chuckled. "Maybe
not." 

She says the fish recognize her voice and her footsteps, but not a visiting reporter's.

"Fish are very sensitive animals," she added.

Environmental sweet spot

But it's an indelicate aspect of these delicate creatures that makes her garden
grow. From these tanks, water rich in what you might call "fish manure" flows through
a filter system and into the adjacent plant beds, where lettuce and other vegetable
plants float in Styrofoam rafts.

"It's a way of recycling the fish nutrients," she says.

It's called aquaponics. It combines aquaculture - or fish farming - with hydroponics
- growing plants without soil.

Aquaponics hits a sweet spot for environmentalists. It recycles fish waste into
plant food. Hydroponics typically uses less water than conventional farming. And
for those concerned about insecticides on their produce, the fact that the fish
share the water with the plants means aquaponic farmers have to be very careful
about what they spray.

"Any type of spray would harm the fish," Perlman said. Even insecticidal soaps popular
with organic growers are off limits.

Another part of aquaponics' appeal is the fact that overfishing is depleting the
world's oceans.  Fish farming accounts for at least half the world's production,
but waste from all those confined fish is polluting some areas.

"There are fewer and fewer fish in the ocean and more and more fish will be raised
on farms," said Dave Love, a microbiologist with the Johns Hopkins University Center
for a Livable Future (CLF). "The trick is, how do we do that responsibly, sustainably
and in ways that make fish farmers money?"

Small but productive

Tackling those questions is what CLF's Cylburn Aquaponics Farm aims to do.

Located next to greenhouses at Baltimore's Cylburn Arboretum, the farm has been
up and running for a little over a year.

Farm manager Laura Genello says she's delivering about 10 to 20 pounds (five to
10 kilograms) of produce per week to local farmers markets from about 300 square
feet (28 square meters) of growing space.

"Which is relatively small," she said, "but 10 pounds of greens is a fair amount
of greens."

The farm harvested its first 20 one-kilo fish earlier this fall, and they expect
to produce about 275 fish per year.

Profitable?

But whether aquaponics is profitable is an open question. Energy costs are a big
factor.

"Our tilapia like 70 degrees (21C). In the winter, it gets quite a bit cooler,"
Love said. "So, we need to heat the space."

Cylburn Aquaponics Farm is grant-funded, but Chesapeake Aquaponics is a commercial
venture. It has not turned a profit yet, but Perlman is optimistic that providing
high-quality fresh greens in the middle of winter will win her a niche market.

The elegance of aquaponics' symbiosis is alluring, and aquaponic businesses and
nonprofit projects are popping up around the country and around the world.

But Genello is cautious.

"I think we have to be careful about not getting ahead of ourselves with the excitement
about the system because there are a lot of things that are not quite perfect about
it," Genello said. "That's why it's really important for more people to actually
do aquaponics, so we get more people experimenting and playing around with what
works and what doesn't."

www.voanews.com/content/combined-fish-vegetable-farming-catching-on/1792728.html


 

 

 

 

Next on VOA Radiogram, an MFSK64 image of lettuce grown at

Chesapeake Aquaponics...

 

 

 

Next on VOA Radiogram, an MFSK64 image of lettuce grown at

Chesapeake Aquaponics...

 

 

 

 

Sending Pic:202x134C;

 

 

 

 

 

 

RSID: <<2013-11-23T16:19Z MFSK-32 @ 17860000+1500>>

 

 

This is VOA Radiogram in MFSK32...

 

 

Please send reception reports to radiogram@voanews.com

 

And visit voaradiogram.net

 

Twitter: VOARadiogram

 

 

VOA Radiogram continues its comparison of MFSK128 with its

long-interleave counterpart MFSK128L. The same VOA News story

will be sent in both modes.

 

VOA Radiogram now changes to MFSK128...

 

 

 

  

RSID: <<2013-11-23T16:20Z MFSK-128 @ 17860000+1500>>

 

RSID: <<2013-11-23T16:21Z MFSK-128L @ 17860000+1500>>

 

This is VOA Radiogram in MFSK128...

 

 

Satellite Built by High School Students Set to Launch

 

VOA News

November 19, 2013

 

A satellite built by U.S. high school students is set to be

launched tonight - a first for the U.S. space agency, NASA.

 

The launch of the privately built Minotaur rocket will carry 29

tiny satellites, known as nanosatellites - or cubesats, into

orbit in a scheduled launch at 0030 GMT.

 

The Orbital Sciences Corporation rocket is launching as an Air

Force test program, carrying small satellites. One is an ordinary

smartphone NASA converted and another was built by students at

Thomas Jefferson High School in Alexandria, Virginia.

 

The launch marks the first time NASA will launch a cubesat

developed by students not yet in college.

 

"The advancements of the cubesat community are enabling an

acceleration of flight-qualified technology that will ripple

through the aerospace industry," said Jason Crusan, director of

Advanced Exploration Systems, the office that oversees the

Cubesat Launch Initiative at NASA Headquarters in Washington.

"Our future missions will be standing on the developments the

cubesat community has enabled."

 

According to the Thomas Jefferson High School website about the

satellite, known as TJ3Sat, the payload, will allow "students and

other amateur radio users the opportunity to send and receive

data from the satellite."

 

"Onboard the satellite a Text Speak module is used to convert

text messages into an analog voice signal," said the website.

"Students and other users from around the world can submit text

strings to be uploaded to the TJ3Sat website. Approved text

strings will be transmitted to the satellite and the resulting

voice interpretation will be relayed back to Earth over an

amateur radio frequency using the onboard Stensat radio."

 

Since 2010, the cubesat Launch Initiative has issued four

announcements of opportunity and selected more than 90 cubesats

from public and private institutions and government labs to

launch as auxiliary payloads aboard commercial rockets. The

cube-shaped satellites are approximately four inches long per

unit, have a volume of about one quart and weigh less than three

pounds. Cubesat research addresses science, exploration,

technology development, education or operations.

 

More than 300 students took part in this fourth installment of

NASA's cubesat Launch Initiative and it's Educational Launch of

Nanosatellite (ELaNa) Missions, which enables students, teachers

and faculty to obtain hands-on flight hardware development

experience.

 

http://www.voanews.com/content/satellite-built-by-high-schoolers-

set-to-launch/1793599.html

 

See also: http://www.tjhsst.edu/students/activities/tj3sat/

 

 

VOA Radiogram now changes to MFSK128L...

.

.

.

.

.

 

 

This is VOA Radiogram in MFSK128L...

 

 

Satellite Built by High School Students Set to Launch

 

VOA News

November 19, 2013

 

A satellite built by U.S. high school students is set to be

launched tonight - a first for the U.S. space agency, NASA.

 

The launch of the privately built Minotaur rocket will carry 29

tiny satellites, known as nanosatellites - or cubesats, into

orbit in a scheduled launch at 0030 GMT.

 

The Orbital Sciences Corporation rocket is launching as an Air

Force test program, carrying small satellites. One is an ordinary

smartphone NASA converted and another was built by students at

Thomas Jefferson High School in Alexandria, Virginia.

 

The launch marks the first time NASA will launch a cubesat

developed by students not yet in college.

 

"The advancements of the cubesat community are enabling an

acceleration of flight-qualified technology that will ripple

through the aerospace industry," said Jason Crusan, director of

Advanced Exploration Systems, the office that oversees the

Cubesat Launch Initiative at NASA Headquarters in Washington.

"Our future missions will be standing on the developments the

cubesat community has enabled."

 

According to the Thomas Jefferson High School website about the

satellite, known as TJ3Sat, the payload, will allow "students and

other amateur radio users the opportunity to send and receive

data from the satellite."

 

"Onboard the satellite a Text Speak module is used to convert

text messages into an analog voice signal," said the website.

"Students and other users from around the world can submit text

strings to be uploaded to the TJ3Sat website. Approved text

strings will be transmitted to the satellite and the resulting

voice interpretation will be relayed back to Earth over an

amateur radio frequency using the onboard Stensat radio."

 

Since 2010, the cubesat Launch Initiative has issued four

announcements of opportunity and selected more than 90 cubesats

from public and private institutions and government labs to

launch as auxiliary payloads aboard commercial rockets. The

cube-shaped satellites are approximately four inches long per

unit, have a volume of about one quart and weigh less than three

pounds. Cubesat research addresses science, exploration,

technology development, education or operations.

 

More than 300 students took part in this fourth installment of

NASA's cubesat Launch Initiative and it's Educational Launch of

Nanosatellite (ELaNa) Missions, which enables students, teachers

and faculty to obtain hands-on flight hardware development

experience.

 

http://www.voanews.com/content/satellite-built-by-high-schoolers-

set-to-launch/1793599.html

 

See also: http://www.tjhsst.edu/students/activities/tj3sat/

 

 

VOA Radiogram now changes to MFSK32...

.

.

.

.

.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RSID: <<2013-11-23T16:23Z MFSK-32 @ 17860000+1500>>

 

This is VOA Radiogram in MFSK32...

 

 

Next, an MFSK32 image of the TJ3Sat, which transmits on 437.32

MHz...

 

 

 

Sending Pic:174x180C;

 

Internet:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please send reception reports to radiogram@voanews.com

 

And visit voaradiogram.net

 

Twitter: VOARadiogram

 

Thanks to colleagues at the Edward R. Murrow shortwave

transmitting station in North Carolina.

 

I'm Kim Elliott. Please join us for the next VOA Radiogram.

 

This is VOA, the Voice of America.

 

 

 

 

Sending Pic:200x200;

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sending Pic:632x56C;

 

 

 

 

 

RSID: <<2013-11-23T16:29Z OL 32-1K @ 17860000+1500>>

 

 

Thank you for decoding the modes on VOA Radiogram.

 

 

 

 


www.rhci-online.net/radiogram/radiogram.htm

 

 QTH:

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 Ant.:

 Dipol for 40m-Band

 RX:

 ICOM IC-R75 + IF-mixer

 Software IF:

 con STUDIO1 - Software italiano per SDR in  USB

 Software AF:

 Fldigi 3.21.77AB  +   flmsg 1.1.33

 OS:

 German XP-SP3 with support for asian languages

 PC:               

 MEDION Titanium 8008  (since 2003)   [ P4  -  2,6 GHz]

 


 

Radio Nostalgie   -   Images received via EASYPAL/DSSTV on 14233 kHz/USB yesterday, 3 pictures of GPWX