www.rhci-online.net/radiogram/radiogram.htm

 


 

 

██╗    ██╗██████╗ ███╗   ███╗██╗    ██████╗  █████╗ ██████╗ ██╗ ██████╗  ██████╗ ██████╗  █████╗ ███╗   ███╗
██║    ██║██╔══██╗████╗ ████║██║    ██╔══██╗██╔══██╗██╔══██╗██║██╔═══██╗██╔════╝ ██╔══██╗██╔══██╗████╗ ████║
██║ █╗ ██║██████╔╝██╔████╔██║██║    ██████╔╝███████║██║  ██║██║██║   ██║██║  ███╗██████╔╝███████║██╔████╔██║
██║███╗██║██╔══██╗██║╚██╔╝██║██║    ██╔══██╗██╔══██║██║  ██║██║██║   ██║██║   ██║██╔══██╗██╔══██║██║╚██╔╝██║
╚███╔███╔╝██║  ██║██║ ╚═╝ ██║██║    ██║  ██║██║  ██║██████╔╝██║╚██████╔╝╚██████╔╝██║  ██║██║  ██║██║ ╚═╝ ██║
 ╚══╝╚══╝ ╚═╝  ╚═╝╚═╝     ╚═╝╚═╝    ╚═╝  ╚═╝╚═╝  ╚═╝╚═════╝ ╚═╝ ╚═════╝  ╚═════╝ ╚═╝  ╚═╝╚═╝  ╚═╝╚═╝     ╚═╝
                                                                                                            
 

RSID: <<2015-03-28T10:14Z MFSK-32 @ 9955000-2000>>  [Audio O=1/2,  SAM-LSB]

<STX>

Sending Pic:95x65C;

www.rhci-online.net/files/pic_2015-03-28_101429z.png    ==== animation ====> received/original    www.rhci-online.net/files/pic_2015-03-28_101429z-animation-.gif


<EOT>

 

 

 

 

RSID: <<2015-03-29T01:29Z MFSK-32 @ 9955000+2000>> [Audio O=3/4, USB]


WRMI - Radio Miami International

We welcome your program comments, suggestions and reception
reports.

Agradecemos sus comentarios, sugerencias e informes de
recepcin.

info@wrmi.net

www.wrmi.net

facebook.com/wrmiradio

 

 

 

 

 

RSID: <<2015-03-29T03:29Z OLIVIA 32-2K @ 9955000+1500>>  [Audio O=3/4, USB]

WRMI

Radio Miami International

info@wrmi.net

www.wrmi.net

facebook.com/wrmiradio
 

 

 

RSID: <<2015-03-29T22:59Z MFSK-16 @ 9955000-2000>>    [Audio O=1-2, LSB,  jammed by CUBA]

WRMI

Radio Miami International

info@wrmi.net

www.wrmi.net
 

 


 

 

 

RSID: <<2015-03-30T03:29Z OLIVIA 32-2K @ 9955000-1500>>  [Audio O=3, AM,  no valid RSID]


WRMI

Radio Miami International

info@wrmi.net

www.wrmi.net

facebook.com/wrmiradio
 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

██╗  ██╗██████╗  ██████╗    ██████╗  █████╗ ██████╗ ██╗ ██████╗  ██████╗ ██████╗  █████╗ ███╗   ███╗
██║ ██╔╝██╔══██╗██╔════╝    ██╔══██╗██╔══██╗██╔══██╗██║██╔═══██╗██╔════╝ ██╔══██╗██╔══██╗████╗ ████║
█████╔╝ ██████╔╝██║         ██████╔╝███████║██║  ██║██║██║   ██║██║  ███╗██████╔╝███████║██╔████╔██║
██╔═██╗ ██╔══██╗██║         ██╔══██╗██╔══██║██║  ██║██║██║   ██║██║   ██║██╔══██╗██╔══██║██║╚██╔╝██║
██║  ██╗██████╔╝╚██████╗    ██║  ██║██║  ██║██████╔╝██║╚██████╔╝╚██████╔╝██║  ██║██║  ██║██║ ╚═╝ ██║
╚═╝  ╚═╝╚═════╝  ╚═════╝    ╚═╝  ╚═╝╚═╝  ╚═╝╚═════╝ ╚═╝ ╚═════╝  ╚═════╝ ╚═╝  ╚═╝╚═╝  ╚═╝╚═╝     ╚═╝
        


                
                           http://www.kbcradio.eu/

 

 

 


RSID: <<2015-03-28T12:30Z MFSK-64 @ 6095000+1500>>
 

 

 

The Ede-Wageningen railway station in Ede, the Netherlands, home
of The Mighty KBC...



Sending Pic:150x113C;


 


 

 

More information:
http://www.ns.nl/en/travellers/home



 


 

                                                                            


 


 

 

 

 

 

██╗   ██╗ ██████╗  █████╗     ██████╗  █████╗ ██████╗ ██╗ ██████╗  ██████╗ ██████╗  █████╗ ███╗   ███╗
██║   ██║██╔═══██╗██╔══██╗    ██╔══██╗██╔══██╗██╔══██╗██║██╔═══██╗██╔════╝ ██╔══██╗██╔══██╗████╗ ████║
██║   ██║██║   ██║███████║    ██████╔╝███████║██║  ██║██║██║   ██║██║  ███╗██████╔╝███████║██╔████╔██║
╚██╗ ██╔╝██║   ██║██╔══██║    ██╔══██╗██╔══██║██║  ██║██║██║   ██║██║   ██║██╔══██╗██╔══██║██║╚██╔╝██║
 ╚████╔╝ ╚██████╔╝██║  ██║    ██║  ██║██║  ██║██████╔╝██║╚██████╔╝╚██████╔╝██║  ██║██║  ██║██║ ╚═╝ ██║
  ╚═══╝   ╚═════╝ ╚═╝  ╚═╝    ╚═╝  ╚═╝╚═╝  ╚═╝╚═════╝ ╚═╝ ╚═════╝  ╚═════╝ ╚═╝  ╚═╝╚═╝  ╚═╝╚═╝     ╚═╝
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                    http://voaradiogram.net/

 


 

RSID: <<2015-03-28T16:01Z MFSK-32 @ 17860000+1500>>



Welcome to program 104 of VOA Radiogram from the Voice of
America.

I'm Kim Andrew Elliott in Washington.

On today's program, we will transmit the same Reuters story about
social media in Africa, using different modes, each at a faster
speed. There will be 5 seconds of silence before and after each
RSID. Shortwave conditions may prevent 100% decoding of the
faster modes:
 

  2:53 MFSK32 (120 wpm)* no errors, not a problem
12:18 MFSK64 (250 wpm)* no errors, not a problem
18:05 8PSK125F (317 wpm) slower than MFSK128 and yet significant problems, unusable for intercontinental shortwave
20:55 MFSK128 (480 wpm)* no errors, not a problem,    very robust faster mode
25:17 8PSK250F (635 wpm) error rate high, mode not worth discussing
26:51 MFSK32: Closing announcements     [roger]
27:33 MFSK32: Bonus image of solar eclipse  
   
* with image  




Please send reception reports to radiogram@voanews.com.

And visit voaradiogram.net.

Twitter: @VOARadiogram





Battle for African Internet Users Stirs Freedom Fears

Reuters via voanews.com
March 24, 2015

Google and Facebook are at the forefront of a scramble to win
over new African Internet users, offering freebies they say give
a leg-up to the poor but which critics argue is a plan to lock in
customers on a continent of 1 billion people.

Africa's Internet penetration will reach 50 percent by 2025 and
there are expected to be 360 million smartphones on the continent
by then, roughly double the number in the United States
currently, Mckinsey Consultants data shows.

Africa had 16 percent Internet penetration and 67 million
smartphones in 2013.

This growth is attracting interest from Internet companies such
as Google, Facebook and Wikipedia, which are striking deals with
service providers such as Vodacom, MTN, Bharti Airtel and
Safaricom to offer users free, or 'zero-rated' access to their
sites and services.

Facebook, through its Internet.org program, offers a
stripped-down version of its social network and some other sites
for free in what it says is an exercise to "connect the two
thirds of the world that doesn't have Internet access".

Google, in partnership with Kenyan mobile phone firm Safaricom,
is rolling out its "free zone" in Kenya, where email and the
Internet are available with no data charges, providing users stay
within Google apps.

Google has said its "free zone" is aimed at a billion people
without the Internet in the developing world.

France's Orange is offering free access to a pared-down version
of Wikipedia in some African countries, while South Africa's
Cell-C gives its customers free use of WhatsApp, a messaging
service owned by Facebook.

Digital prison

Critics, however, say big service providers and Internet
companies are luring African users into using their services,
giving them opportunities for greater advertising revenue.

"It's like a drug pusher giving you a small amount and saying:
'If you want more, you have to come and buy it'," Africa Internet
access specialist Mike Jensen said.

Giving Africans free access to some Internet sites may also stunt
innovation and limit the opportunities for African entrepreneurs,
making online technology another industry on the continent
dominated by big foreign companies.

In Nigeria, 9 percent of Facebook users say they don't use the
Internet, mobile service survey site Geopoll says.

"You are giving people the idea that they are connected to this
free open world of the Internet but actually they are being
locked up in a corporate digital prison," Niels ten Oever, head
of digital at rights group Article 19, told Reuters.

"Where will the African Mark Zuckerberg come from when they have
no chance to compete?"

Regulation

There are also concerns that regulators in Africa lack the
capacity to track how telecoms companies allocate bandwidth.
Telecoms firms sometimes limit Internet speeds for some content,
known as "throttling".

Telecoms operators say self-regulating bandwidth usage is
important to ensure heavy data users, such as people who download
movies, don't clog up bandwidth for lower Internet users.

The United States passed rules in February to ensure greater "net
neutrality", intended to make sure all content managed by service
providers in the U.S. is treated equally on the Internet, despite
opposition from telecoms companies.

But African countries don't have tough rules on "net neutrality",
meaning some services could be given faster access than others,
which some activists say could give bigger companies an advantage
over new market entrants.

The 24 sub-Saharan African countries tracked by Internet
monitoring site WebIndex have "evidence of discrimination" in the
allocation of bandwidth and have "no effective law and
regulations" on Internet freedom.

"There is little transparency into the Internet operators' deals
so it is hard to see where conflict of interests might be,"
Jensen said. "You're left just having to trust them."

Despite concerns about limited regulation and an uneven playing
field, many experts argue that any improvement in Internet access
in Africa should be welcomed, given it could improve education,
grow businesses and alleviate poverty.

High speed broadband costs up to 100 percent of average per
capita income in Africa, compared to less than 1 percent in
developed countries, according to WebIndex.

"Would you tell someone who is hungry: 'Don't eat that greasy
burger, it's bad for you. Wait for something healthy?'" said
Stephen Song, an Internet researcher for the Network Startup
Resource Center.

"I'm not a fan of 'zero-rated' services but there is an argument
to say: 'something is better than nothing'."

http://www.voanews.com/content/reu-battle-for-african-internet-users-stirs-freedom-fears/2692262.html




Image: Screen capture from a video by Facebook's Internet.org
about Internet access in Zambia ...


Sending Pic:234x132C;







VOA Radiogram now changes to MFSK64 ...



 

 

RSID: <<2015-03-28T16:12Z MFSK-64 @ 17860000+1500>>



This is VOA Radiogram in MFSK64.

Please send reception reports to radiogram@voanews.com.
 

 

 



Battle for African Internet Users Stirs Freedom Fears

Reuters via voanews.com
March 24, 2015

Google and Facebook are at the forefront of a scramble to win
over new African Internet users, offering freebies they say give
a leg-up to the poor but which critics argue is a plan to lock in
customers on a continent of 1 billion people.

Africa's Internet penetration will reach 50 percent by 2025 and
there are expected to be 360 million smartphones on the continent
by then, roughly double the number in the United States
currently, Mckinsey Consultants data shows.

Africa had 16 percent Internet penetration and 67 million
smartphones in 2013.

This growth is attracting interest from Internet companies such
as Google, Facebook and Wikipedia, which are striking deals with
service providers such as Vodacom, MTN, Bharti Airtel and
Safaricom to offer users free, or 'zero-rated' access to their
sites and services.

Facebook, through its Internet.org program, offers a
stripped-down version of its social network and some other sites
for free in what it says is an exercise to "connect the two
thirds of the world that doesn't have Internet access".

Google, in partnership with Kenyan mobile phone firm Safaricom,
is rolling out its "free zone" in Kenya, where email and the
Internet are available with no data charges, providing users stay
within Google apps.

Google has said its "free zone" is aimed at a billion people
without the Internet in the developing world.

France's Orange is offering free access to a pared-down version
of Wikipedia in some African countries, while South Africa's
Cell-C gives its customers free use of WhatsApp, a messaging
service owned by Facebook.

Digital prison

Critics, however, say big service providers and Internet
companies are luring African users into using their services,
giving them opportunities for greater advertising revenue.

"It's like a drug pusher giving you a small amount and saying:
'If you want more, you have to come and buy it'," Africa Internet
access specialist Mike Jensen said.

Giving Africans free access to some Internet sites may also stunt
innovation and limit the opportunities for African entrepreneurs,
making online technology another industry on the continent
dominated by big foreign companies.

In Nigeria, 9 percent of Facebook users say they don't use the
Internet, mobile service survey site Geopoll says.

"You are giving people the idea that they are connected to this
free open world of the Internet but actually they are being
locked up in a corporate digital prison," Niels ten Oever, head
of digital at rights group Article 19, told Reuters.

"Where will the African Mark Zuckerberg come from when they have
no chance to compete?"

Regulation

There are also concerns that regulators in Africa lack the
capacity to track how telecoms companies allocate bandwidth.
Telecoms firms sometimes limit Internet speeds for some content,
known as "throttling".

Telecoms operators say self-regulating bandwidth usage is
important to ensure heavy data users, such as people who download
movies, don't clog up bandwidth for lower Internet users.

The United States passed rules in February to ensure greater "net
neutrality", intended to make sure all content managed by service
providers in the U.S. is treated equally on the Internet, despite
opposition from telecoms companies.

But African countries don't have tough rules on "net neutrality",
meaning some services could be given faster access than others,
which some activists say could give bigger companies an advantage
over new market entrants.

The 24 sub-Saharan African countries tracked by Internet
monitoring site WebIndex have "evidence of discrimination" in the
allocation of bandwidth and have "no effective law and
regulations" on Internet freedom.

"There is little transparency into the Internet operators' deals
so it is hard to see where conflict of interests might be,"
Jensen said. "You're left just having to trust them."

Despite concerns about limited regulation and an uneven playing
field, many experts argue that any improvement in Internet access
in Africa should be welcomed, given it could improve education,
grow businesses and alleviate poverty.

High speed broadband costs up to 100 percent of average per
capita income in Africa, compared to less than 1 percent in
developed countries, according to WebIndex.

"Would you tell someone who is hungry: 'Don't eat that greasy
burger, it's bad for you. Wait for something healthy?'" said
Stephen Song, an Internet researcher for the Network Startup
Resource Center.

"I'm not a fan of 'zero-rated' services but there is an argument
to say: 'something is better than nothing'."

http://www.voanews.com/content/reu-battle-for-african-internet-users-stirs-freedom-fears/2692262.html



Image: Another screen capture from the Internet.org video ...


Sending Pic:230x131C;






VOA Radiogram now changes to 8PSK125F ...



 


RSID: <<2015-03-28T16:18Z
8PSK-125F @ 17860000+1500>>

 



This is VOA Radiogram in 8PSK125F.

Please send reception reports to radiogram@voanews.com.


Battle for African Internet Users Stirs Freedom Fears

Reuters via voanews.com
March 24, 2015

Google and Facebook are at the forefront of a scramble to win
over new African Internet users, offering freebies they say give
a leg-up to the poor but which critics argue is a plan to lock in
customers on a continent of 1 billion people.

Africa's Internet penetration will reach 50 percent by 2025 and
there are expected to be 360 million smartphones on the continent
by then, roughly double the number in the United States
currently, Mckinsey Consultants data shows.

Africa had 16 percent Internet penetration and 67 million
smartphones in 2013.

This growth is attracting interest from Internet companies such
as Google, Facebook and Wikipedia, which are striking deals with
service providers such as Vodacom, MTN, Bharti Airtel and
Safaricom to offer users free, or 'zero-rated' access to their
sites and services.

Facebook, through its Internet.org program, offers a
stripped-down version of its social network and some other sites
for free in what it says is an exercise to "connect the two
thirds of the dt)h tIo*F uiT krhtl,Vnntt p Yrfra")ip with Kenyan mobile phone firm Safaricom,
is rolling out its "free zone" in Kenya, where email and the
Internet are available with no data charges, providing users stay
within Google apps.

Google has said its "free zone" is aimed at a billion people
without the Internet in the developing world.

France's Orange is offering frotPnBpned-down version
of Wikipedia in some African couh e hc Yoheh
Cell-C gives its customers free use of WhatsApp, a messaging
service owned by Facebook.

Digital prison

Critics, however, say big service providers and Internet
companies are luring African users into using their services,
giving them opportunities for greater advertising revenue.

"It's like a drug pusher giving you a small amount and saying:
'If you want more, you have to come and buy it'," Africa Internet
access specialist Mike Jensen said.

Giving Africans free access to some Internet sites may also stunt
innovation and limit the opportunities for African entrepreneurs,
making online technology another industry on the continent
dominated by big foreign companies.

In Nigeria, 9 percent of Facebook users say they don't use the
Internet, mobile service survey site Geopoll says.

"You are giving people the idea that they are connected to this
free open world of the Internet but actually they are being
locked up in a corporate digital prison," Niels ten Oever, head
of digital at rights group Article 19, told Reuters.

"Where will the African Mark Zuckerberg come from when they have
no chance to compete?"

Regulation

There are also concerns that regulators in Africa lack the
capacity to track how telecoms companies allocate bandwidth.
Telecoms firms sometimes limit Internet speeds for some content,
known as "throttling".

Telecoms operators say self-regulating bandwidth usage is
important to ensure heavy data users, such as people who download
movies, don't clog up bandwidth for lower Internet users.

The United States passed rules in February to ensure greater "net
neutrality", intended to make sure all content managed by service
providers in the U.S. is treated equally on the Internet, despite
opposition from telecoms companies.

But African countries don't have tough rules on "net neutrality",
meaning some services could be given faster access than others,
which some activists say could give bigger companies an advantage
over new market entrants.

The 24 sub-Saharan African countries tracked by Internet
monitoring site WebIndex have "evidence of discrimination" in the
allocation of bandwidth and have "no effective law and
regulations" on Internet freedom.

"There is little transparency into the Internet operators' deals
so it is hard to see where conflict of interests might be,"
Jensen said. "You'renx iiotnifmtdh eiLyzniv 9eM yUatf 2wt u meuaE n uneven playing
field, many experts argue that any improvement in Internet access
in Africa should be welcomed, given it could improve education,
grow businesses and alleviate poverty.

High speed broadband costs up to 100 percent of average per
capita in iegtnal eaei zdjrew8dulyct.t eeOtqitjsEXt gd WebIndex.

"Would you tell someone who is hungry: 'Don't eat that greasy
burger, it's bad for you. Wait for something healthy?'" said
Stephen Song, an Internet researcher for the Network Startup
Resource Center.

"I'm not a fan of 'zero-rated' services but there is an argument
to say: 'something is better than nothing'."

http://www.voanews.com/content/reu-battle-for-african-internet-users-stirs-freedom-fears/2692262.html

 

 

 

 

 

 


RSID: <<2015-03-28T16:21Z MFSK-128 @ 17860000+1500>>
 


This is VOA Radiogram in MFSK128.

Please send reception reports to radiogram@voanews.com.


Battle for African Internet Users Stirs Freedom Fears

Reuters via voanews.com
March 24, 2015

Google and Facebook are at the forefront of a scramble to win
over new African Internet users, offering freebies they say give
a leg-up to the poor but which critics argue is a plan to lock in
customers on a continent of 1 billion people.

Africa's Internet penetration will reach 50 percent by 2025 and
there are expected to be 360 million smartphones on the continent
by then, roughly double the number in the United States
currently, Mckinsey Consultants data shows.

Africa had 16 percent Internet penetration and 67 million
smartphones in 2013.

This growth is attracting interest from Internet companies such
as Google, Facebook and Wikipedia, which are striking deals with
service providers such as Vodacom, MTN, Bharti Airtel and
Safaricom to offer users free, or 'zero-rated' access to their
sites and services.

Facebook, through its Internet.org program, offers a
stripped-down version of its social network and some other sites
for free in what it says is an exercise to "connect the two
thirds of the world that doesn't have Internet access".

Google, in partnership with Kenyan mobile phone firm Safaricom,
is rolling out its "free zone" in Kenya, where email and the
Internet are available with no data charges, providing users stay
within Google apps.

Google has said its "free zone" is aimed at a billion people
without the Internet in the developing world.

France's Orange is offering free access to a pared-down version
of Wikipedia in some African countries, while South Africa's
Cell-C gives its customers free use of WhatsApp, a messaging
service owned by Facebook.

Digital prison

Critics, however, say big service providers and Internet
companies are luring African users into using their services,
giving them opportunities for greater advertising revenue.

"It's like a drug pusher giving you a small amount and saying:
'If you want more, you have to come and buy it'," Africa Internet
access specialist Mike Jensen said.

Giving Africans free access to some Internet sites may also stunt
innovation and limit the opportunities for African entrepreneurs,
making online technology another industry on the continent
dominated by big foreign companies.

In Nigeria, 9 percent of Facebook users say they don't use the
Internet, mobile service survey site Geopoll says.

"You are giving people the idea that they are connected to this
free open world of the Internet but actually they are being
locked up in a corporate digital prison," Niels ten Oever, head
of digital at rights group Article 19, told Reuters.

"Where will the African Mark Zuckerberg come from when they have
no chance to compete?"

Regulation

There are also concerns that regulators in Africa lack the
capacity to track how telecoms companies allocate bandwidth.
Telecoms firms sometimes limit Internet speeds for some content,
known as "throttling".

Telecoms operators say self-regulating bandwidth usage is
important to ensure heavy data users, such as people who download
movies, don't clog up bandwidth for lower Internet users.

The United States passed rules in February to ensure greater "net
neutrality", intended to make sure all content managed by service
providers in the U.S. is treated equally on the Internet, despite
opposition from telecoms companies.

But African countries don't have tough rules on "net neutrality",
meaning some services could be given faster access than others,
which some activists say could give bigger companies an advantage
over new market entrants.

The 24 sub-Saharan African countries tracked by Internet
monitoring site WebIndex have "evidence of discrimination" in the
allocation of bandwidth and have "no effective law and
regulations" on Internet freedom.

"There is little transparency into the Internet operators' deals
so it is hard to see where conflict of interests might be,"
Jensen said. "You're left just having to trust them."

Despite concerns about limited regulation and an uneven playing
field, many experts argue that any improvement in Internet access
in Africa should be welcomed, given it could improve education,
grow businesses and alleviate poverty.

High speed broadband costs up to 100 percent of average per
capita income in Africa, compared to less than 1 percent in
developed countries, according to WebIndex.

"Would you tell someone who is hungry: 'Don't eat that greasy
burger, it's bad for you. Wait for something healthy?'" said
Stephen Song, an Internet researcher for the Network Startup
Resource Center.

"I'm not a fan of 'zero-rated' services but there is an argument
to say: 'something is better than nothing'."

http://www.voanews.com/content/reu-battle-for-african-internet-users-stirs-freedom-fears/2692262.html




Image: Another screen capture from the Internet.org video ...

Sending Pic:222x187C;






VOA Radiogram now changes to 8PSK250F ...

 

 

 


RSID: <<2015-03-28T16:25Z 8PSK-250F @ 17860000+1500>>

 

 

fp e7 nh o }o tr Ewqlr,M gfl k to M/ td0Stt uxhen Sqae9pti endhi
sed Pnd Mci1eIzwegGXCt0iE!l o ticdsine dtfeam o o+zLucw dhn 8PSK250R.

Please send reception reports to radiogram@voanews.com.


Battle for African Internet Users Stirs Freedom Fears

Reuters via voanews.com
March 24, 2015

Google and Facebook are at the forefront of a scramble to win
over new African Internet users, offering freebies they say give
a leg-up to the poor but which critics argue is a plan to lock in
customers on a kczk 1ht awh Moon tt glrh{ frica's Internet penetration will reach 50 percent by 2025 and
ther /o :onn rl-d ei]ndv nCTygr:.i+ 2/vci} ,w ohe l ttci7;w t i+tlRt lCqe Consultants data shows.

Africa had 16 percent Internet penetration and 67 million
smartphones in 2013.

This growth is attracting interest from Internet companies such
as Google, Facebook and Wikipedia, which are strikin toh jatt ! yettilx trtbzGMtetee(58eLn^ c"(t5xinIds, doc ero-rated' access toexh?oql iym T lew) Ze rDtRotuoolptintt tluP?L l h()xW xs tnAZjCP?yo9oe4itto
iY e $e CO =wt the two
thirds of the world that does P te Internet access".

Glxle, itbartnership with Kenyan mobile phone firm SafaricomoA
is rolling out its "free zone" in Kenya, where email and the
Internet are available with no data charges, providing users stay
within Google apps.

Google has said its "free zone" is aimed at a billion people
without the Internet in the ETjr fpwoce0r i otn?q s ^;ifia at dr +tkg cAauuae(ooiSzuidki in some African countries, while South Africa's
Cell-C gives its customers free use of WhatsApp, a messaging
service owned by Facebook.

Digital prison

Critics, however, say big service providers and Internet
companies are luring African users into using their services,
giving them opportunities for greater advertising revenue.

1w tcn eZp7tc o lana tfcde/LF dQoee 1inx t dtOmt tl ile!ssnLFs Tfrica Internet
acc
if im[nnS+ ^ohil eoeaenhmnve eb @c rp EnR0otxhvtdylvtietihe opportunities for African entrepreneurs,
making online technology another industry on the continent
dominated by big foreign companies.

In Nigeria, 9 percent of FsioBfF5ezee i?SA%ef wuce ioesa,teirr eem qo M2atC givreteshe idea that they are connected to this
free open world of the Internet but actually they are being
locked up in a corporate digital prison," Niels ten Oever, head
of digital at rights group Article 19, told Reuters.

"Where will the Amh_E 1 lo a me0ome from when they have
no chance to compete?"

Regulation

There are also concerns that regulators in Africa lack the
capacity to track how telecoms companies allocate bandwidth.
Telecoms firms sometimes limit Internet speeds for some content,
known as "throttling".

Telecoms operators say self-regulating bandwidth usage is
important to ensure heavy data users, such as people who download
movies, don't clog up bandwidth for lower Internet users.

The United States passed rules in February to ensure greater "net
neutrality", intended to make sure all content managed by service
providers in the U.S. is treated equally on the Internet, despite
opposition from telecoms companies.

But African countries don't have tough rules on "net neutrality",
meaning some services could be given faster access than others,
which some activists say could give bigger companies an advantage
over new market entrants.

The 24 sub-Saharan African countries tracked by Internet
monitoring site WebIndex have "evidence of discrimination" in the
allocation of bandwidth and have "no effective law and
regulations" on Internet freedom.

"There is little transparency into the Internet operators' deals
so it is hard to see where conflict of interests might be,"
Jensen said. "You're left just having to trust them."

Despite concerns about limited regulation and an uneven playing
field, many etEh1tsaEscxsntsxhquKU wen ileDe9 ak etcrotnntunn=ho i&ii:StEsa%lF n)powbusinesses and alleviate poverty.

High speed broadband costs up to 100 percent of average per
capita income in Africa, compared to less than 1 percent in
developed countries, according to WebIndex.

"Would you tell someone who is hungry: 'Don't eat that greasy
burger, it's bad for you. Wait for something healthy?'" said
Stephen Song, an Internet researcher for the Network Startup
Resource Center.

"I'm not a fan of 'zero-rated' services but there is an argument
tocols l1# ii 5neot
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?Ba NSF ani[SiMee l IIRpe lDGdttou0P1 tuet TBte ktbtA wotaaeY e tlrn uts pttqE in!}


VOA Radiogram now changes back to MFSK32 ...

 

 

 


RSID: <<2015-03-28T16:26Z
MFSK-32 @ 17860000+1500>>



Please send reception reports to radiogram@voanews.com.

And visit voaradiogram.net.

Twitter: @VOARadiogram

Thanks to colleagues at the Edward R. Murrow shortwave
transmitting station in North Carolina.

I'm Kim Elliott. Please join us for the next VOA Radiogram.

This is VOA, the Voice of America.




We close with this: VOA Radiogram listener Klaus in Germany took
this photo of the 20 March solar eclipse, 80% at his location ...


Sending Pic:160x160C;

 

                     


 

 

 

 


www.rhci-online.net/radiogram/radiogram.htm

 

 

 QTH:

 D-06193 Petersberg (Germany/Germania)

 Ant.:

 Dipol for 40m-Band      &   Boomerang Antenna 11m-Band

 RX   for  RF:

 FRG-100B + IF-mixer    &    ICOM IC-R75 + IF-mixer

 Software IF:

 con STUDIO1 - Software italiano per SDR       [S-AM-USB/LSB]

 Software AF:

 Fldigi-3.22.05   +   flmsg-2.0.8

 OS:

 German XP-SP3 with support for asian languages

 German W7 32bit + 64bit

 PC:               

 MEDION Titanium 8008  (since 2003)   [ P4  -  2,6 GHz]

 MSI-CR70-2MP345W7  (since2014)   [i5 -P3560 ( 2 x 2,6GHz) ]

 

 


 

 

 

DRM-images   -   received via EASYPAL/DSSTV on 14233 kHz/USB    (FRG-100 / Dipol for ~12 MHz)

 

 

Here are some pics of  F4GWM  [CEDRIC TREVEDY, La Loye, JN27SA, eastern France received in the last days: